Deeper Than Accupuncture

So it’s been a while, but when the writer of a blog about running ceases to run, well, there’s not much to write. Sure I’ve dabbled here and there, but there isn’t a whole lot to share about a junk mile filled with discomfort. And I’ve been busy.

Back when this whole Achilles thing first happened, one of the therapies suggested was dry needling (along with Graston and a bunch of others). Of course, I was slow to go with any therapy, but eventually I gave Graston a shot to no avail. In fact, it seemed to make things worse. Not long after the Graston didn’t work, I gave up on running – March 23, 2016 – altogether. I think I can say that over the last six months, things have improved, but I’m not entirely sure. The progress has been slow. Small nags, morning stiffness, discomfort. It’s all still present.

I can’t say why I finally went for it, but three weeks ago, I jumped on the dry needling. I didn’t really do my homework before hand. I knew I was going to have some needles stuck in me. I knew there’d be some discomfort. I knew the trigger points would (hopefully) be released. I did not know how much discomfort would be following me around for the next day and a half.

Generally speaking the needling wasn’t that bad. When he would find a knot and stab it a few times, that’s when the discomfort would escalate a bit. I’ve read of people likening it to an electric shock, and I guess that is true to some degree, but while a shock seems to let go after a bit, the dry needling holds that shock. Imagine a calf cramp – the type that wakes you up  at night with your toe thrust downward while you fumble to find your toes and pull them back up – well dry needling isn’t that bad, but it’s that prolonged cramp feeling that leaves you feeling exhausted and sore afterwards. Not having run an actual workout in at least a year, the exhausted ache afterwards was just the bump I’ve needed.

The first dry needle course really did a number and I wish I had taken the advice I received over two years ago and gone with the dry needling right away. The amount of Achilles discomfort subsided significantly.  It was exciting – and hopeful, so hopeful. I’ve had a second course and while things are better, it’s not ready yet. I’ve read of Achilles taking a year or more to recover. It’s not ruptured, so there’s that glimmer. For now, I just need to keep getting needled for my exhausted-muscle fix.

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