Runningskirts.com, Dude.

The first running skirt I went with was something from runningskirts.com. They’ve been around for a while, eleven years I think, and they were the first brand mentioned on twitter. When I first went to their site they had a ton of patterns that I was pretty excited about. Unfortunately, because I’m not a lady but a man in ladies clothing, the sizing was a little bit of an issue and the number of patterns to pick from was hugely limited.

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Wide waist band.

There were also two sizing options; I could have gone with their running skirt which has a built in brief or their athletic skirt which is a tad longer and has built in compression shorts. I went with the athletic skirt. I’m not sure how the brief would have fit, but I’m guessing that a brief built for a woman is going to be built a little differently than a brief built for a dude. But then, I’m not an underwear designer, so I don’t know.

Like I said, my print selection was limited, so I went with the pink plaid. The skirt fairy (their customer service person) told me that the pink isn’t really that pink and the gray tones it down.

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Does this make my butt look big?

For all intents and purposes, it did, and in truth, I was quite comfortable with my choice of pattern. The skirt was about mid-thigh, which is longer than I typically wear my running shorts, but for some reason, it made me a little uncomfortable and I wanted it to be a shade longer. Of course once I started running, it was fine.

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Velcro Pocket…

It had a pocket with a nice little Velcro clasp, but I’m not sure what you could actually put in it. I suppose a key would fit but I’d be worried it could easily escape.

The biggest issue I had with the skirt was probably the sizing. I used their chart and opted for a size 4. My waist is about a 31/32 depending on the time of year, and I wear a size 14 women’s in women’s jeans. Going by waist size I should have been a size 4, by women’s pant sizes I was a size 5, so I opted with the 4. In reality a 3 would probably be better.

The main problem I had with the fit was the looseness of the waist. Not a tenth of a mile down the road and I had to hike it up. If I wasn’t going for just a short run, I’d have turned around and got changed. Every 45 seconds or so I had to hike my skirt up.

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Look at those calves!

For me this was the end. Maybe a size 3 would have worked, but who knows. Overall, it is an option for dudes looking for a skirt or a kilt though the lack of pleats leaves it looking much more skirt than kilt.

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Kilt, Skirt, Whatever

I think it was seeing a picture on Facebook of Gordy Ainsleigh in a running skirt, or maybe it’s my fascination with gaudy, over-the-top patterns (have you seen my B.O.A. collection?). Either way something caught my attention that I liked.

As far as I can tell, a running skirt is no more than a pair of compression shorts with something to give the naughty-bits a little coverage. I’ve always worn compression shorts for soccer, so why not for running? One afternoon before my wife got home from work I gave one of her Target skirts a run out. (Shhhhh…). I didn’t totally hate it and so I started looking into what kind of running skirts they have out there that are dude friendly and found two things: there’s not a lot of options, and these things are freaking expensive.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday were coming so I figured I’d give some of the options a go and if they didn’t jive, just return them.

Realistically there are three or four options in the way of running skirts or kilts. None of them are particularly cheap, but they do make for some fun running. Follow the links to individual reviews – from a dudes perspective.

Sport Kilt
Running Skirts
JWalking Designs

U.H.T.P.: Urban Hippy Tripster Pack

I have two bags from Orange Mud, the Modular Gym Bag which I failed to review (but will one day), and the newly released Urban Hippy Tripster Pack. The UHTP was in the pipeline for a long time. We kept hearing whispers of how awesome this pack was, and finally we saw a picture of the prototype. We were awestruck and couldn’t wait it’s release. Josh took it to an expo in Texas, and  while it was in his car, some jack-hole broke in and stole it, along with his Mac book. Que setback.

Anyway production finally picked up and the UHTP started shipping earlier this month. Like all the OM products, the UHTP is an over-engineered beast. It’s not your typical backpack with chintzy zippers you hope will last the school year, or low-grade canvas that will rip by brushing a rose bush. This thing is made of high quality 1680 denier nylon. (Truth, I had no real idea what that was until I Googled it, but rest assured it’s Quality.) I have no doubt you could really beat on this bag and it would hold up without issue.

The straps are a thickly padded material that doesn’t allow digging into the shoulders when the pack is fully loaded. There is also a padded section on the lower back area. Anyone who has ridden a bike or skateboard with heavy, hard objects in a backpack knows the genius of this aspect of the bag. The straps also have two plastic D-rings that let you clip on gear. (I have a dog leash clip because strays are the rule down here.) You can also clip or hook things in on the straps as I’ve done with that bright orange thing. (I’ll explain it at the end.)

The last sweet external feature of the pack is the cup/bottle holders on the outside. There are two – one on each side. They easily hold my kids water bottles, and I have no problem stuffing mine in on the other side – I use a glass spaghetti sauce jar. According to the website they can hold a 25oz water bottle or a big beer. I’m not sure you could get a 40oz in there, but a 22oz tall boy is a for sure fit.

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Beverage pocket.

Quality taken care of, it is time to move into the pack. Again, familiar to all OM fans, there are pockets and sections galore and if you didn’t have a guide book, you wouldn’t find them all. The main section is quite roomy and allows for any number of things. I keep a running ‘go bag’ inside that includes a pair of shoes, socks, shorts, shirt, and buff. Along with my gear is usually a book ranging in size from a Bible to slim paperback. (You never know when you’ll find the perfect place for a run and God forbid I get stuck somewhere with nothing to read…). While I don’t have a laptop of any sort, if I did, the UHTP comes with a built in case. It’s a super padded, zippered envelope like case that velcros into the pack. I use this for delicate things like my tablet or the current issue of UltraRunning magazine.(When visiting the PT I brought three pairs of shoes in the pack and had room for more.)wp-1448853175496.jpg

If you look at the picture you can kind of see the bottom of the main pocket. It’s built with a foam type liner. It gives the pack a little bit of shape, and allows items to be a bit protected while not being too rigid.

In the top of the pack is a soft stretchy pocket that – according to the website – provides enough room for two pairs of sunglasses. I would disagree and say that unless you’re wearing dinner plate glasses you can easily fit four or five pairs in there. The pocket material reminds me of the same shoulder pockets familiar to users of the Hydra Quiver or the Vest Pack2.

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Below the sunglass pocket is the coolest pocket on a a backpack – ever. Most backpacks have a back pocket that becomes a trash receptacle of broken pens and pencils, melted gum and candy wrappers, and any other assortment of lint and broken paperclips. The UHTP comes with a ‘pen panel’. It’s essentially an organizing system for your pens with room for electronic devices. (Check the website for specs. I’m not into all the fancy-schmancy pods and electronics and such…). I like to keep a couple of pens handy along with hair ties (me or my daughter), and some snacks. This pocket can fit a box of granola bars with plenty of room to spare.

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But the best part of the pen panel? It’s velcroed in. What? Yes, velcroed. When the pen panel is removed a secret compartment is revealed. It’s big enough to fit an 8×12 document. Think passports, cash, etc.

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Now, earlier, I mentioned that Orange thing in the picture. It’s a parachord bracelet which is pretty nice. Rope is always good. If you look closely at the buckle you’ll see on one end there seems to be something strange on the buckle.

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That strange thing, that’s a whistle. A very loud whistle if you want it to be. Take my word for it. Or ask my five year old…

Now the parachord bracelet doesn’t typically come with the UHTP, but for Cyber Monday the folks at Orange Mud are giving it away with any purchase, free shipping on orders over $40, and 20% off. And all you have to do is enter the gift code CMON20GIFT.

The pack comes in black with orange straps, or olive straps. (I chose olive.) There’s also a camo version with orange straps that looks pretty dope. And starting to ship on 12/4 is the black with pink strap version. Should look pretty schnazzy.

Also going on today, SKORA Running is having a sitewide 25% off sale, plus a Soleus GPS watch for only $50 with every order. Can’t beat that!

Lots of good deals and it’s all pretty easy, so enjoy your Cyber Monday, ya’ll!

FORM Review

IMG_8400Some time ago – back in October – I got a pair of SKORA Form. Yes, October was a long time ago; it was over three months ago. So why has it taken this long to write up a review? Partly sheer laziness, and part of it was me trying to put some miles on these guys. Ideally, I like to get atleast 200 miles on a shoe before I make any ground shattering pronouncements, and with my buggered up achilles and off-season, I didn’t get 200 on these guys until mid-December. (I know it’s mid-January, but shh…).

Anyway, if you’ve followed along on this blog, or read my SKORA reviews (PHASE, CORE, FIT), you know that each shoe appears to outdo the last. Well, the FORM has without a doubt, outdone them all. I kid you not, this is the best shoe I have ever worn; running or other.

There’s so much good about these shoes, I don’t know where to start, so I’ll start from the top. Like the CORE, the FORM are made from Pittards Goat Leather. I’m not sure if the FORM undergo different treatment than the CORE, but the uppers seem a little different; slightly more supple while being a little bit thicker. There is also a patch of Pittars sheepskin in the heel of the shoe to keep your foot from sliding around on some silky smooth goat leather.

Like all SKORA to date, there is essentially no tongue, but instead a sort of wrap

Velcro

Velcro

that goes underneath the asymmetrical lacing system. The lack of a standard tongue and the asymmetrical lacing eliminates hot spots. There are no pressure points when you tie these shoes on meaning if you want, you can go barefoot with next to no ‘break-in’ period. SKORA has also included a velcro strap across the back of the heel that allows you to tighten the shoe down from the back. To be honest, I’ve never really tried to play around with this much. I tightened it a couple of times and really didn’t like it. I much prefer the heel to have some movement.

They also have a reflective stripe down the center of the faux-tongue and the heel. The reflection only occurs when light hits the stripe, so while these shoes are typically all black, there is a built in saftey feature for night runners.

The FORM, like all SKORA models is a zero-drop shoe, but has a stack height of 13mm. (2 more than the PHASE and CORE, but 3 less than the FIT.) I removed my insole for a stack height of 10mm. The heel is rounded to provide a more anatomically correct fit and the sole is made from two different materials. There is the black, molded EVA, and then the blue high abrasion rubber. The high abrasion rubber allows you to run on some pretty gnarly surfaces and still put many miles on these shoes.

The ground feel on these is quite nice, but not quite as good as the CORE or the PHASE with the insoles removed. This is due in part to the extra 2mm of stack on the FORM and also the high abrasion rubber. Despite this though, the FORM provides a great ride in ultimate comfort.

woodsI can’t say that I’ve beat on these shoes to the max, but I have given them a pretty good run through. They’ve been on trails, roads, tracks, snow, ice, water, pretty much everything. With their low profile, they also double up as everday shoes when the weather is too crummy for flip flops (which it is quite frequently this time of year…).

Another huge plus that I love about the leather FORM, is the ability to retain heat, but breath. Typically with synthetic shoes, I would have to double up on socks when temps dip to single digits and below (Farenheit), but with the FORM, a cheap pair of cotton socks is all I need.

One of the big drawbacks to the FORM is it’s price, but this can be looked at a couple of ways. They cost $180. That’s a lot of money. At the same time, these shoes will not break down. You won’t poke holes in them with your toes, or trip over a stick and rip them down the middle. And you’re going to have to work quite hard to wear the sole down. That said, these shoes can easily go twice the distance a mid-range running shoe will normally get you, and when (if) the sole wears down, you can still use them as casual shoes without any problems.

form and cordAnother trick is to pay attention for sales and discount codes. Right now SKORA is running a massive 30% off sale, and if you use the code ‘warmup10’ at checkout, they’ll give you an additional $10. That’s a pair of FORM for $115. Seriously, one of the best bargains out there. And while you check out the sale, make sure to sign up for the newsletter, that’s how ou find out about these sales, and you get entered into a raffle for a free pair of FIT. It’s almsot like stealing…

Other SKORA Reviews
PHASE
CORE
FIT

The Answer in My Hand

When my love affair with Orange Mud earlier this year, I was quite intent on the Hydra Quiver being the only hydration system I would need. I had no idea that Orange Mud would continue to pump out phenomenal products and that I would find a need for all of them. Soon enough I found myself gearing up for the VT100 (Parts I, II, III) and realized I’d need something with a little more storage room and a bit more in terms of fluids. Que the Vest Pack. Sadly – for my wallet – I loved the VP and couldn’t imagine utilizing orange mud’s awesome return policy. While the VP isn’t my everyday goto, it is supremely useful for longer treks.

My Orange Mud.

My Orange Mud arsenal.

Being content now with both the Vest Pack and Hydra Quiver, I thought my journey withy Orange Mud would be done. Of course, I was wrong. Not too long ago they released their version of a handheld. Unlike packs, handhelds seem to have more of a polarized following. People can take or leave a pack, but a handheld is different. You either love handhelds or you hate them. I put myself in the camp of the latter.

I can’t really explain why, but for some reason I like to have my hands free. My wrists clean of any accoutrements. Bracelets fluster me. If I hold onto something for longer than five or ten minutes, my fingers start freaking out, screaming at me to let go. I want to wiggle them and free them from their bonds. I imagine my hands feel like someone suffering from claustrophobia stuck in a coffin. So for me, a handheld was a no brainer bad idea.

Sweaty October.

Sweaty October.

Of course, after reading some reviews, and knowing how much I love my VP and HQ, I had to give the handheld a try. The price was right at under $30, and I knew if I wanted to send it back I could. (I also knew if I didn’t want it, I could probably sell it to someone who did.) And here we are today.

I got the handheld specifically for shorter-long events. For times when it might be nice to have a drink, but not necessary to carry a whole pack. When it first came, I was a little skeptical. It’s just a strap and a water bottle. But when I put it on, I realized the folly of my ways. It wasn’t just a strap, but a glove. It fit nice and snug around my hand, but let my fingers wiggle and move. The trapped, suffocating feeling I was dreading didn’t exist.

The mighty Mt. Ascutney.

The mighty Mt. Ascutney.

Knowing that I had a Six Hour coming up that I wanted to use the handheld for, I started using it on every run. I practiced switching hands mid-run, and even tried to fill it on a few occasions still stuck to my hand – not the best idea.

It holds my watch for me!

It holds my watch for me!

Taking it on a six hour was the first real test. I’d have the chance to fill it every 2.62 miles, and grab any food I’d need. At first, I just grabbed a couple of cookies, but I eventually ended up shoving a couple of Cliff Bar Gel things in there (they were foul…). In the end, I couldn’t have been more pleased with it. I like to run minimally, with just the basic things I need. On a 2.62 mile loop, I didn’t need much some water, and a bit of food, and the handheld did just that. It probably would have worked for me on longer loops too. I filled the bottle with water once every hour or so, and if I wanted, I could have used a bigger bottle.

To be frank, I’ve fallen quite in love with my handheld. The strap wraps around the meat of your hand and is connected to a gigantic pocket that holds the bottle. Your fingers are free. It’s genius and kind of deceiving, after all, your hand isn’t really doing any holding on.

If you’re a handheld kind of person, it’s time to give the Orange Mud Handheld a try. And if you’re scared of handhelds, this is the one to break you in.

Happy Fall – Sort Of…

Happy Fall – Sort Of…

I don’t mind fall, but it harbours winter, and that sucks for a lot of reasons around here. But fall isn’t all bad: I can finally use Xfinity’s (Comcast, dirty bastards) ability to DVR 15 shows all at one time! (I actually don’t have a TV and didn’t realize there was that much TV worth watching.) In seriousness though, fall brings new lines of… SHOES!!!

Yup. SKORA just put out their new Fall/Winter Line-Up. There’s lots of sweet colors to run with. One of my favorites is the Ladies Cyan Flo. Yellow FIT.ladies cyan fit Unfortunately, I can’t fit them, so I’ll have to stick with the men’s selections, which are equally as sleek. There are a couple of men’s Fit, including a variation from the intial releases silver/cyan. These are cyan and black which really makes the cyan pop. And then there’s a black on black FIT, which almost looks it coudl be worn in a formal setting without much hoopla. men black-black
There’s also a blue-monochroatic iteration of the PHASE which looks totally dope, especially if blue is your thing.blue phase And if blue isn’t your think, there’s a pretty sweet dark version of the CORE. They call it Gray/Green/Black, but it’s so much more. A dark shoe, not black with a splash of color. Humble and quiet spoken, but shouting at the same time.gray core And then of course is my favorite. The digital camo FORM. Dark, but not too dark, and a bright red sole. Something about that colored sole just does it for me. I mean, how can it not?form
Now the question becomes, which one to get first…

Stop Scouting; Try Skout

Skout TrailbarsI always used to ‘try to eat healthy,’ after all, I think most people do. I don’t ever recall anyone saying “I try not to eat healthy. I really want to get morbidly obeese.” Of course, when the kids were born, the questionably healthy foods started being left out of the shopping cart. No more granola bars. Nutri grain bars – not tasty, but easy – were left on the shelf. It’s actually been a bit of a struggle to find pre-packaged snacks that the kids would eat, I would eat, and didn’t contain all the fake sugars and preservatives.

My wife and I dabbled in making our own crackers and cereal bars. We dried out own fruit for a while, and while they were usually pretty tasty, it was time consuming, expensive, and the results with the kids were always hit or miss.

Cue Skout Organic Trailbars. I had heard about them online a few times, but never really looked into them. Finally, I took the plunge. Turns out, it was a pretty good idea. They’re based out in Oregon and make organic trail snacks aimed at the adventurous, outdorsy types. Not only are they organic, but they are verified non-GMO (to me this is almost more important than being organic), and for all you gluten sensitive folks, they’re gluten free, too. They’re also vegan, dairy free, and kosher. So unless you’re a real odd duck, there should be one for you…

The main ingredient for the Trailbars is Dates. which for my liking gives them a bit too much sugar. Though it doesn’t taste sweet. Dates are also pretty dense when blended up and smashed into a shape. However, with the dates being dense, half a bar is pretty filling, a whole bar is certainly a snack that will suffice. All the bars come in between 170-200 calories. When I give them to the kids, I give them less than half a bar each and they’re set. While the dates and the bars are a little high in sugar for me, it is natural sugar with the fiber of the date so it’s not absorbed massively fast by the body only to turn your metabolism into a mess.

Chunks of apple.

Chunks of apple.

Unfortunately, they didn’t have any Cherry Vanilla in stock, so I was only able to try four of their five flavors: Chocolate Coconut, Chocolate Peanut Butter, Apple Cinnamon and Blueberry Almond. I think I liked them in that order. The two chocolate bars were quite tasty, with the PB bar only having subtle hints of PB flavor. The Apple Cinnamon bar was next. The were some chunks of dried apple in the bar which gave it more of a springy, light, chewy texture. It was good but not my favorite. My kids, however, did really like it. The same was true of the Blueberry Almond bar. I thought I was going to love it based on name. I was miserably wrong. Not sure what it was, but it was the worst of the bunch, and I won’t be trying it again.

In the end, I was really pleased with the Skout Organic Trailbars. They tasted good (for the most part), were very filling, and are made with wholesome ingredients I don’t hesitate to give to my children. I won’t be taking these on the run with me – they’re just too dense for anything quicker than a 50 miler – but will be taking them when I go hiking and foraging for sure.

Orange Mud HydraQuiver Vest Pack 2 Review

Some months ago, before it was warm enough to wear shorts, I purchased the Orange Mud HydraQuiver. I had tried it before, so I was ready for all the love. As time went on, and I thought about doing longer runs in the warm weather, I realized I might need to carry more water with me for those runs that didn’t go by semi-potable water. For a while, I contemplated buying the Double Barrel (a HydraQuiver with two bottles), but around that same time, there was talk about the new Orange Mud Vest Pack 2. I decided to wait, and I’m glad I did.

The chest strap, pocket, and shoulder pocket.

The chest strap, pocket, and shoulder pocket.

Essentially, the Vest Pack is a Double Barrel with chest straps that come down the front of your chest with straps to connect running parellel to the ground. The two shoulder pockets from the HQ are still in tact, but the chest straps also allow for two large pockets that sit lower on your chest. The VP is also designed so

Chest pocket.

Chest pocket.

that a third water bottle can be stored between the two existing water bottles, or an extra storage bag can be purchased from Orange Mud.

Like the HydraQuiver, the VP carries the water high on your shoulders, almost

Because three is better than two.

Because three is better than two.

between the shoulder blades. At first it may seem like it sits rather high and might be a bit awkward, but as far as packs go, this is by far the easiest place I’ve found to carry water. There’s no bouncing, even with the VP fully loaded with 72 ounces of liquid, there’s no smashing into your back. Instead it seems to stay glued to your back/shoulders. This also leaves your lower back open, which for me, is preferable when running in the heat.

The shoulder pockets are made of an elastic material that expands quite well. I used just the two shoulder pockets for a 50 miler, and had no problems with space. At Vermont 100, I used the shoulder pockets to stash my flashlight, keys, cell phone, and other non-essentials that might have proven to be useful. This left the chest pockets to be used for food. The shoulder pockets have an elastic band to synch the front of the pocket and then a velcro strap that covers the opening. Things falling out is of little concern. The shoulder pockets sit on top of the pack so there is no digging in; it’s hard to tell they’re even there.

Huge chest pocket.

Huge chest pocket.

The chest pockets are quite large. Large enough to stash a whole cheeseburger, or my fist. (I’ve tried both.) I also kept drink powder, and sandwich bags of sweet potato. I was never once concerned about filling the pack up. At one point, I put a cup of ice in one of the pockets, synched it off, and had ice for a couple of miles which was pretty nice. Towards the end, I also stuffed a bunch of tater tots in there which proved to be difficult when it came time to get them out – I don’t recommend it, maybe if you put them in a cup but… One of the chest pockets also holds a key clip if you’re worried that the shoulder pocket is inadequate.

Me and my boy!

Me and my boy!

The pack itself is incredibly light weight and made of a high grade medical quality mesh. It’s breathable, lets sweat wick away, and can ride on bare skin without any problems. There are three adjustable straps that run paralel to the ground that connect the chest straps/pockets to the back of the pack and also in front. The two side straps do the major adjustment for size, while the front strap makes the minor adjustments.

I’m not sure I’d use this pack for a 50 miler, or even a heavily aided 100 miler like Vermont (my VT100 expierence Part I, II, III) – for those I think the Double Barrel would be adequate – but for events that aren’t buffets, this is certainly the pack to have. You can check them online at Orangemud.com.

Like the do-dah man.

Like the do-dah man.

The FITs

FitA couple days before the Fourth of July, I got a nice little package in the mail, sent by the kind folks over at SKORA Running. I knew they were sending me a new pair of kicks, but I didn’t have a tracking number and it came rather quickly, so it was a bit of a surprise to say the least. I also had no idea of the colour.

What I did know was that it was a pair of their newest offering the FIT. I have to admit, the FIT scared me a little bit at first. All the talk around the internet and their website tout it’s padding and cushy ride, a sort of “Introduction to Zero Drop” type shoe. Being used to running barefoot or in the CORE or PHASE with an 8mm stack, the double 16mm stack of the FIT also gave me some fright. To top off my fears the FIT is also a tad bit narrower than the CORE or PHASE and I wasn’t sure how that would fit my flipper like feet.

Padded heel.

Padded heel.

As soon as I get shoes out of the box, I do a full inspection. Sure pictures online are nice, but once you get a shoe in your hand you notice things you’d otherwise miss. The first thing I noticed is the cushion. Not the cushion of the sole, but the cushion in the heel. I wouldn’t really describe it as cushion so much as padding. The padding is what you would find in something of a traditional shoe and it seems to envelop your heel. Your heel is still free to move about, but the padding keeps things sort of loose feeling but tight at the same time. Almost like it doesn’t exist, if that makes any sense. I actually prefer this to the heel of the PHASE and the CORE, a fact that totally caught me off guard. (I was planning on disliking this shoe…).

The next thing I noticed upon inspection was the insole. The insole is huge, a full 6mm, bigger than anything I’ve run in in sometime. To be honest, I haven’t noticed a difference between it and my other shoes, so it gets a pass.

FIT insole on the top, CORE on the bottom.

FIT insole on the top, CORE on the bottom.

As with all my shoes, I took them out of the box, put them on, and wore them around the house for the first couple of days. I do this so I can send shoes back if they don’t fit, but it also allows me to tweak lacing systems to better fit my feet. I always start with the laces super loose and then tighten them down; surprisingly with the FIT, I ended up tightening the laces back to their ‘factory preset’. I’m fairly sure it has to do with the 3d-dot printing being super stretchy and flexible. While the forefoot of the shoe does fit somewhat tight, it stretches and doesn’t cause any problems like a traditional canvas/mesh shoe that doesn’t stretch.

I don't think I really run like that...

I don’t think I really run like that…

At first, I started out planning on just using them for low mileage days pushing the stroller, or just taking it easy. However, that plan has quickly changed and the FIT has become my new go to shoe. Depending on the day I will take the 6mm insole out which leaves the shoe with a 10mm stack, but more often than not, I’m running with the full 16mm. I have yet to notice any significant difference in ground feel or handling when running on roads, track or trails.

When I got my CORE, I fell in love and thought nothing would replace it. Sadly, it’s been pushed to the back of my closet and the FIT is now my go to shoe. I was planning on running the VT100 in the CORE, but  now I’m planning on wearing the FIT. We’ll see if any problems arise, but I kind of doubt it. I doubt the 3d dot will last as long as the leather of the CORE, but that just means I might have to give the FORM a try…

As an addendum, I should mention that while I normally wear a size 10, I wear a 10.5 in the FIT. I could probably get away with a 10, but it would be tight.

You can connect with SKORA on FacebookTwitterPinterestInstagram, or on their website. They have a plethora of running related information, and a crackpot customer service team that is beyond helpful.

More Reviews:
SKORA Core
SKORA Phase

Checking In With My CORE

Peek-a-Boo

Peek-a-Boo

So, a few weeks ago I got a pair of SKORA Core in the mail and was super excited. Running in the PHASE for a while, I was a little apprehensive to try a new shoe, after all, the PHASE worked, so why change it up? My feet are rather wide – and I think I like wider shoes anyway – so I’m always leery trying a new shoe, that said, the PHASE and the CORE are built on the same platform, and being made of leather the CORE is supposedly ends up being about a half size wider.

The mailman delivered them a day early which was a wonderful surprise – he neglected to come Friday and Saturday before Mother’s Day so my cards were late, again. As I opened the box I was slapped with that wonderful leather smell of a high end boutique. That, too, was quite pleasant. I put them on and walked around the house as any runner with a new pair of shoes who can’t get a run in right away will do. They were comfy. Comfy and roomy.

Typically the first thing I do with a pair of shoes is to unlace the bottom one or two eyelets to let my forefoot expand, with the CORE, I didn’t need to. It held my foot nicely and there wasn’t a lot of tension in the forefoot area.

Not quite animal print, but still sexy.

Not quite animal print, but still sexy.

Usually, I also like to wear a shoe for 200 miles or so before I decided to make any decisions, and while I haven’t hit 200 just yet, I have worn them in the rain, on the track, trails, and asphalt, as well as raced in them, so I feel fairly confident I’ve put in enough diverse miles to make a judgement call.

One of the big things with this shoe is that it is made of leather, which means that it is more durable than the mesh upper of the PHASE, but it also means it retains water a bit better, which is not a good thing. Before I got any chance to run in a real rain storm, I took them across some fields just after it rained. There weren’t big puddles, but there was definitely a fair bit of residual water still in the grass. My feet did get wet, and the remained moist a bit longer than they would in the PHASE, but not nearly as long as I expected. It also didn’t seem to add as much weight as I expected. The leather did stay damp through the evening and into the morning while the PHASE would have dried, the moisture didn’t seem to wet the feet at all. Though, the first time, the dye ran and turned my toes a mottled blue color.

The next big thing was getting these guys out on the trail. I’m not a big trail guy – I prefer dirt roads – but I do venture into the woods occasionally. Being that these two shoes are built essentially on the same platform – there is a slightly stiffer piece of rubber under the metatarsals on the CORE – I wasn’t expecting much of a difference on the trails. And, as it would turn out, there wasn’t much of a difference. The leather of the CORE feels (and probably is) a bit more durable than the PHASE and feels a little more protective on the trails, but I assume this is just perceived.

To this point I had fallen in love with my CORE. They are an awesome everyday running shoe, and I’m even contemplating getting a pair for non-running (I never wear shoes…). Then came the real test – a race (or some speed work on the track). On the track they felt good, but maybe a little loose. I worked on tightening them down and it seemed to help some. I then wore them for the Covered Bridges Half Marathon. Again, they felt awesome, but they felt a bit loose. It wasn’t an uncomfortable, unwearable loose, but for quicker events I think I like my shoes to fit a bit snugger – i.e. the PHASE.

Super comfort.

Super comfort.

At first, I thought the PHASE and the CORE wouldn’t have much difference. They’re built on the same platform. I was wrong, the leather upper of the CORE makes for a very comfy and somewhat roomy feel. The CORE also has a stiffer piece of rubber on the sole – I assume this adds some durability as well as protection. Some people mention that the ankle collar on the PHASE can be less than comfortable when new, this is not the case for the CORE. The CORE has a comfy piece of sheep skin around the heel that works well with socks, I can only imagine how comfy it feels sockless.

These shoes have quickly become a favorite for me, and I’m looking forward to getting more in the future. The only problem I’ve found is the tightening aspect. I think because they are made of leather, the last will stretch a little and in the beginning, the stretching is more, meaning you need to tighten the laces from time to time. I’m not sure I would wear them for races shorter than a marathon as the PHASE has those distances covered.

If you have further questions, or want to know more, connect with Skora on FacebookTwitterPinterestInstagram, or on their website. They have a plethora of running related information, and a crackpot customer service team that is beyond helpful.

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